Sunday, April 22, 2018

The Canol Road, Yukon, Canada

In April 1942, the U.S. military embarked on a grand scheme to tap a local source for vitally needed oil to support its northern World War II operation.

The war effort included construction of the Alaska Highway, the deployment of thousands of troops in Alaska to guard against a feared Japanese invasion from the captured Aleutian Islands, and a major airlift of supplies to Siberia to aid a beleaguered Russian army’s ultimately successful struggle to turn back a German invasion.
The Canol (short for Canadian Oil) Road was part of a project to build a pipeline and a road from Norman Wells, Northwest Territories to Whitehorse, Yukon during World War II.

The pipeline no longer exists, but the 449 kilometres (279 mi) long Yukon portion of the road is maintained by the Yukon Government during summer months.

The 4 inch pipeline was laid directly on the ground, and the high grade of the oil allowed it to flow even at −80 °F (−62 °C). Workers on the road and pipeline had to endure mosquitoes, black flies, extreme cold and other difficult conditions.

One poster for the company that hired workers warned that the conditions could be life-threatening; emphasising that if people were not willing to endure the conditions, they should not apply for the work. The oil flow commenced in 1944, but was shut down in 1945, having not performed entirely satisfactorily.
The primary pipeline between Whitehorse and Canol was later removed and sold for use elsewhere. The refinery was purchased in early 1948 by Imperial Oil, dismantled, and trucked to Alberta for the Leduc oil strike.

The roadway is the surviving legacy of the Canol project. Although abandoned in 1946–1947, the southernmost 150 miles (240 km) was reopened in 1958 to connect Ross River, Yukon with the Alaska Highway.



Friday, April 20, 2018

Canadian Pacific Railway Limited - CP.t

Canadian Pacific Railway Limited - CP.t was founded in 1881 to physically unite Canada and Canadians from coast to coast.

Canadian Pacific spun out its five subsidiaries into separate companies in late 2001. CPR's 14,000-mile network extends from the Port of Vancouver to The Port of Montreal, and to the U.S. industrial centers of Chicago, Newark, Philadelphia, Washington, New York City and Buffalo.

On April 20, 2018 the media released News

The Globe and Mail reports in its Friday edition that Canadian Pacific Railway has begun shutting down its domestic rail network and told shippers it will not handle any Canadian goods as of early Saturday morning, ahead of a possible weekend strike by two of its unions. The Globe's Eric Atkins writes that the move precedes a possible Friday night walkout by the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference that could halt much of the country's rail freight. A strike by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers risks shutting down parts of commuter railways serving Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. CP said: "CP has commenced and will continue to execute a safe and structured shutdown.








http://canadastockjournal.blogspot.com/2016/03/canadian-pacific-railway-limited-cpt.html

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Suncor Energy Inc. - SU.t

Suncor Energy Inc. - SU.t produces oil, natural gas, wind-generated electricity and ethanol. Oil sands operations are the focus of Suncor’s business.

The company operates a network of 1,500 Petro-Canada retail and wholesale outlets across Canada and a network of retail sites under the Shell and Phillips 66 brands in Colorado.
On March 14, 2018 the company released News

Suncor today announced that the Syncrude maintenance turnaround originally scheduled to begin in April, will be moved up by approximately one month.

On March 15, Syncrude plans to begin an eight-week turnaround, which was originally scheduled to begin in April. Advancing the turnaround will permit Syncrude to address an unrelated issue which has been constraining capacity on a line that feeds bitumen from the mine to the upgrader. Executing the turnaround and resolving the line issue at the same time will make more efficient use of resources and minimize the overall impact on production.

With the change in turnaround timing, Syncrude production for the first quarter is expected to be reduced to approximately 140,000 barrels of oil per day (bbls/d), net to Suncor. However, Syncrude’s forecasted production for the full year remains within the annual guidance range.